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 Mar 09, 2005 - 01:00 PM - by Michael
* Another worm attacks MSN Messenger

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
IM services in general just can't catch a break - yet another IM Worm is going after MSN Messenger users, and there are a few targeting AIM as well.

And it used to be in the old days that nobody used anything but ICQ... which is now conspicuously absent on the target list.

Bropia has been joined by a number of new IM worms in recent weeks. Kelvir, which first appeared on Sunday, has already spawned three new variants, according to data from Symantec (Profile, Products, Articles). MSN is not the only victim. The Stang and Aimdes viruses spread over America Online's (Profile, Products, Articles) AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) network.

The new worms all target machines that run Microsoft's Windows operating system and steal IM contacts from machines they infect, meaning that victims often receive IM messages containing the virus from friends or acquaintances. The worms also use so-called "social engineering" tricks, such as vague but familiar-sounding messages and salacious file attachments to get users to open files that install the virus or visit Web pages that install viruses, spyware or Trojan horse programs on the victim's machine.
Keep patched, and watch out for suspicious messages.
 

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