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 Nov 29, 2004 - 03:00 PM - by Michael
* Cell details to come February

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
In hardware news, CNN Money reports that the "cell" chip architecture, supposedly 10 times faster than current computer chips, will see details reaching the public in February.

It's the technology IBM wants to put into its new workstations, Toshiba is putting into televisions, and Sony wants to use for the PS3.

"In the future, all forms of digital content will be converged and fused onto the broadband network," Ken Kutaragi, executive deputy president and COO of Sony, said in the release. "Current PC architecture is nearing its limits."

IBM said it would start pilot production of the microprocessor at its plant in East Fishkill, N.Y., in the first half of 2005. It will use advanced 300 millimeter silicon wafers, which yield more chips per wafer than the 200 mm kind.

It also announced plans to first use the chip in a workstation it is developing with Sony, targeting the digital content and entertainment industries.

Sony said it would launch home servers and high-definition televisions powered by Cell in 2006, and reiterated plans to use the microchip to power the next-generation PlayStation game console, a working version of which will be unveiled in May.

Toshiba said it planned to launch a high-definition TV using Cell in 2006.
I can't quite agree that the PC architecture is reaching its limits, but I can see where for other applications the multi-core chip is a good thing; both Intel and AMD have already started working on dual-core chips as well.
 

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