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 Jul 26, 2010 - 12:33 PM - by Michael
* iPhone Jailbreak Legal?

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
According to Apple Insider, the US Government is announcing new rules to specifically hit mobile devices and make things like iPhone jailbreaking unquestionably legal:

The report noted that every three years, the Library of Congress' Copyright Office authorizes exemptions to ensure existing law does not prevent non-infringing use of copyrighted material.

In addition, another exemption was approved that would allow all cell phone users to unlock their device for use on an unapproved carrier. Currently, Apple's iPhone is available exclusively through AT&T, but unlocking it can allow for voice calls and EDGE data speeds on rival carrier T-Mobile.

Other exemptions announced Monday allow people to break protections on video games to investigate or correct security flaws; allow college professors, film students and documentary filmmakers to break copy protection measures on DVDs to embed clips for educational purposes, criticism, commentary and noncommercial videos; and allow computer owners to bypass the need for external security devices (dongles) if the hardware no longer works and cannot be replaced.
We'd still do better to kill the DMCA altogether.
 

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