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 Nov 11, 2009 - 04:10 PM - by Michael
* Bad Patent

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
According to Groklaw, Microsoft's patented the Sudo command, or something similar enough to make Linux users shout "prior art" from the hilltops. And so on and so forth:

Please don't ever again write to me that software patents are good for us because they include full disclosure, so others can build on the "invention".

And to the USPTO, whose representative just argued in oral argument in Bilski that software should be patentable and that software can make a regular computer a special use computer, and all that drivel, please put those thoughts together with this patent, and consider the market implications of giving anyone that kind of monopoly, and especially the implications of giving it to a monopoly named Microsoft. It's like giving a serial killer his very own machine gun, stronger than any gun his intended victims are allowed to purchase. You have to ask, what were you thinking?

Obviously, if they could figure that out, they'd never have issued this patent in the first place. The fact that they did, without realizing the implications, or the obviousness, or the prior art, tells us that the USPTO simply lacks the foundational technical information, or the awareness of technical history, to make wise patent decisions about software and patents.

 

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