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 Mar 17, 2009 - 09:05 AM - by Michael
* Fixing Undersea Cable

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
REAL hardware men at work - Popular Science has an article on the guys who fix things like intercontinental undersea cable and how they do it.

The cables regularly fail. On any given day, somewhere in the world there is the nautical equivalent of a hit and run when a cable is torn by fishing nets or sliced by dragging anchors. If the mishap occurs in the Irish Sea, the North Sea or the North Atlantic, Rennie comes in to splice the break together.

On one recent expedition, Rennie and his crew spent 12 days bobbing in about 250 feet of water 15 miles off the coast of Cornwall in southern England looking for a broken cable linking the U.K. and Ireland. Munching fresh doughnuts (a specialty of the ship?s cook), Rennie and his team worked 12-hour shifts exploring the rocky seafloor with a six-ton, $10-million remotely operated vehicle (ROV) affectionately known as "the Beast."
Ever wondered how your email gets to Europe and back, and how much maintenance it all takes? This is a great look into that world.
 

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