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 Feb 12, 2009 - 01:39 PM - by Michael
* Academic Emulator

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
A university in Britain is trying to create a universal emulator to allow old games of all sorts to be preserved and played in the future:

"Early hardware, like games consoles and computers, are already found in museums. But if you can't show visitors what they did, by playing the software on them, it would be much the same as putting musical instruments on display but throwing away all the music. For future generations it would be a cultural catastrophe," according to Dr David Anderson from Portsmouth University, who is heading up a remarkable new project to save all the digital info and games created since the 1970s.

...

"People don't think twice about saving files digitally -- from snapshots taken on a camera phone to national or regional archives," comments Dr Janet Delve.

"But every digital file risks being either lost by degrading or by the technology used to 'read' it disappearing altogether. Former generations have left a rich supply of books, letters and documents which tell us who they were, how they lived and what they discovered. There's a very real risk that we could bequeath a blank spot in history."
I really can't add more to that. I hope, fervently, that the program is released to the public.
 

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