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 Jun 19, 2007 - 08:20 AM - by Michael
* Family Tree via DNA

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Personal Stuff/Random News
Ancestry.com is apparently going to try offering DNA results as another tool for building family trees:

In the coming months, Ancestry.com will release technology that captures DNA test results in an ever-expanding, searchable database. Using this database, users can easily identify distant cousins and tap into thousands of hours of already-completed genetic genealogical research, breaking through family tree dead-ends or barriers such as missing or inaccurate records and name changes. Ancestry.com is also developing technology that will allow users to integrate DNA results with the historical documents already in their online family trees.

?DNA research becomes more meaningful to people searching for relatives as more people?s DNA results become part of the database,? said Doug Fogg, chief operating officer of Salt Lake City-based Sorenson Genomics, a division of Relative Genetics.
It'll be interesting to see how well this turns out; seems expensive for now. Plus, you and your "distant relative" have to pony up before finding out you're related.
 

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