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 Aug 03, 2006 - 09:00 AM - by Michael
* Rambus an illegal monopoly

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
After years of legal battles, the FTC has ruled definitively today: Rambus is an illegal monopoly.

The ruling stems from Rambus's deceptive conduct that got their patents included in the current RIMM and DDR SDRAM memory standards.

?Rambus withheld information that would have been highly material to the standard-setting process within JEDEC,? the opinion continues. ?JEDEC expressly sought information about patents to enable its members to make informed decisions about which technologies to adopt, and JEDEC members viewed early knowledge of potential patent consequences as vital for avoiding patent hold-up. Rambus understood that knowledge of its evolving patent position would be material to JEDEC?s choices, and avoided disclosure for that very reason.?

?Through its successful strategy, Rambus was able to conceal its patents and patent applications until after the standards were adopted and the market was locked in,? states the opinion. ?Only then did Rambus reveal its patents ? through patent infringement lawsuits against JEDEC members who practiced the standard.?
Hopefully, this might bring RAM prices down a bit more as companies stop having to pay royalties to Rambus.
 

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