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 Jul 26, 2005 - 11:00 AM - by Michael
* Payola Confirmed

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Playstation2/Sony
Turns out Sony's in the hot seat - many of their recent "hits" on the radio were actually bought and paid for. Yahoo's got more as well.

See above: The internal memos from Sony Music, revealed today in the New York state attorney general's investigation of payola at the company, will be mind blowing to those who are not so jaded to think records are played on the radio because they're good. We've all known for a long time that contemporary pop music stinks. We hear "hits" on the radio and wonder, "How can this be?"

Now we know. And memos from both Sony's Columbia and Epic Records senior vice presidents of promotions circa 2002-2003 ? whose names are redacted in the reports but are well known in the industry ? spell out who to pay and what to pay them in order to get the company's records on the air.

From Epic, home of J-Lo, a memo from Nov. 12, 2002, a "rate" card that shows radio stations in the Top 23 markets will receive $1000, Markets 23-100 get $800, lower markets $500. "If a record receives less than 75 spins at any given radio station, we will not pay the full rate," the memo to DJs states. "We look forward to breaking many records together in the future."
If you thought radio sucked recently... you're right, and that's why.
 

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