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 Jun 30, 2005 - 02:00 PM - by Michael
* Xbox-capable Televisions?

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
Sort of like those embedded video game systems you find in hotels, but available at home?

Forget the video game console ? your TV could already have the brains to play those games. A coy Microsoft Chairman
Bill Gates hinted Thursday that his company might license the software underlying its
Xbox gaming machine to a variety of outside companies in a bid to expand the market share for the Xbox machine ? a platform that trails the sector's No. 1 Sony PlayStation.

The U.S. software company is considering offering "the basic software" for Xbox, although no decision has been made, Microsoft Japan spokesman Kazushi Okabe said Thursday, confirming the Gates' comments reported in Thursday's editions of Japan's top business daily Nihon Keizai Shimbun
More likely than not, this is not going to hit many home gamers. Savvy electronics buyers try to keep their TV separate from other units like the DVD player and game systems, and sometimes even the sound system - that way, if one piece breaks, the rest is still usable.
 

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