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 Apr 27, 2005 - 12:30 PM - by Michael
* MS's hardware security plans

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PC Games/Hardware/Microsoft
The Register has details on trusted computing in Longhorn.

Secure Startup will combine full-volume encryption, integrity checks and the hardware-based Trusted Platform Module (TPM) to detect malicious changes to the computer and protect the user's data if the laptop is stolen, the software giant stated at its annual Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC). The Trusted Platform Module is a standards-based hardware design created by the Trusted Computing Group, of which Microsoft is a member. (SecurityFocus's parent company, Symantec, is a contributing member of the group.)

While the technologies, once known as Palladium and now called the next-generation secure computing base (NGSCB), will help companies and consumers lock down their computers and networks, concerns remain that the hardware security measures could also be used to lock-in consumers to a single platform and restrict fair uses of content.
No kidding. I can just see it now: "Oops, you installed Linux. That contravenes (section x) of the Trusted Computing code... your laptop will now self-destruct."
 

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