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 Mar 11, 2009 - 09:00 AM - by Michael
* Screwing Innovation?

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Personal Stuff/Random News
At Newswise, a pair of economists who say that the current copyright and patent setups harm, rather than encourage, innovation:

The authors argue that license fees, regulations and patents are now so misused that they drive up the cost of creation and slow down the rate of diffusion of new ideas. Levine explains, "Most patents are not acquired by innovators hoping to protect their innovations from competitors in order to get a short term edge over the rest of the market. Most patents are obtained by large corporations who have built portfolios of patents for defense purposes, to prevent other people from suing them over patent violations."

Boldrin and Levine promote a drastic reform of the patent system in their book. They propose the law should be restored to match the intent of the U.S. Constitution which states: Congress may "promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writing and discoveries."
Many of us have been saying this for years - copyright, especially, has gone so far that things are stolen from the public domain all the time, but nothing new has entered it in decades.
 

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