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 Jan 14, 2008 - 09:00 AM - by Michael
* Malware in Retail

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Personal Stuff/Random News
The Register carries a stern warning - malware is now hitching a ride on retail devices.

Be careful when installing new stuff.

Going forward, infections may no longer always be accidental, said Sachs, who is also the executive director of government affairs at telecommunications provider Verizon.

"I think that supply-side attacks are going to go from zero to some small percentage," he said. "It is obviously not going to be as dangerous as mass mailing email infections, but you could have some really clever targeted attacks."

In the latest incidents, three photo frames made by Tuscaloosa, Ala.-based Advanced Design Systems, and bought from different Sam's Club stores, each contained a Trojan horse, according to reports to the SANS Internet Storm Center. The malicious code appears to act like a rootkit, hiding itself and disabling access to antivirus resources.
And then of course, Sony keeps trying to slip its rootkits back into various products after their audio CD debacle.
 

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