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 Jan 09, 2008 - 08:14 AM - by Michael
* Logic Bomb = Jail Term

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Personal Stuff/Random News
A former medco sysadmin just got 30 months from planting a logic bomb in his former employer's systems:

The logic bomb, which was designed to delete "virtually all of the information" on about 70 Medco servers, was made up of malicious code that Lin wrote and planted in multiple scripts on the company network, according to court documents. It was designed to trigger at a certain time and date. That didn't happen, though. The first time the logic bomb was set to go off, a coding error kept it from working. And before the second time it was set to go off, one of Lin's own co-workers discovered the code hidden amidst a slew of other scripts and shut it down.

Finding the logic bomb was quite a feat, according to Liebermann, who called it a "sophisticated" attack. He explained that Lin used innocuous names to disguise the files holding the malicious code. He also went into the system's file properties and made it appear that they were old files and not something recently added that might need checking out.
They dodged a bullet. And it's anyone's guess how many other items like that are lurking in other systems.
 

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